October 26, 2021, 23:50:14

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This week's guest is Terri Nunn from the band "Berlin":
https://curiouscreaturespodcast.com/?p=2298

QuoteTerri Nunn (Berlin) joins Lol and Budgie this week on Curious Creatures. Lol and Budgie discover that the journey is half the battle. The three discuss whether or not musicians have social issues, and if music is the bridge (apparently it's good for your heart). Lol, Budgie and Terri wonder if the magic of music lasts forever. Do kids listen to and draw their own inspiration from their parents' music now? Terri talks about having the opportunity to go back and reassure her younger self that it's all going to be ok. Later on Lol and Budgie get into drum machines and decide they are ok - AND they're not afraid of them!
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Other Artists / Re: Nice interviews to read
Last post by Ulrich - Today at 09:36:36
https://www.thenational.scot/culture/19668424.mike-scott-waterboys-10-things-changed-life/
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Something else / Re: Currently Watching
Last post by MeltingMan - October 24, 2021, 19:42:27
Al Shares A Bed With Marcy! | Married With Children 🤣

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Something else / Re: Here it is... the book thr...
Last post by MeltingMan - October 23, 2021, 16:41:33
Canada, of all places, is the Guest of Honor at this year's Frankfurt Book Fair. Just don't get it wrong: I lost a book that was already out of print this year in the mail, which was ordered as a reimport from (French) Canada. No problem - the purchase price was refunded immediately and the publisher has now (with presence of mind) released a paperback version (L'Éternelle jeune fille. Une ethnocritique du Rêve de Zola by Marie Scarpa). Great.

🙂
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Something else / Re: Here it is... the book thr...
Last post by SueC - October 23, 2021, 15:01:43
Quote from: Ulrich on October 23, 2021, 14:30:22Thanks for ruining another song for me with such weak assumptions. :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:  :mad:  :1f629:  :anguished:

When a song has a different effect on someone else than it has on you, it shouldn't ruin it for you. Just like it doesn't ruin bananas for me that Brett doesn't like them.  :winking_tongue

I like a lot of songs you don't like, and you like a lot of songs I don't, and personally I think that is cool and ruins nothing.

But if I've ruined How Long Will I Love You? for you because of what I've said about that and other songs like it, then I've ruined all romantic songs for you that make promises that people don't usually live up to. Sometimes they do - but mostly it's like what Nick Lowe caricatures in All Men Are Liars. Most singers who sing about loving someone forever and ever are with the next item a couple of years later - it's pretty predictable - and writing the next forever and ever song about them, and then about the next person after that - and the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result... :lol:

History bore out that Mike Scott didn't stay with the person forever and ever he wrote that forever and ever song for, either. Or the next one after that he thought was "the one" etc (and maybe that's because most people's romantic ideas aren't very realistic, but a bit rooted in fairytales about romance, and they mistake strong feelings caused by reproductive brain chemistry for love when those are quite different things). So no assumptions there. Personally if I can't live up to unrealistic promises, I stop making them - and I'd think it was unrealistic if I hadn't lived up to my first lot of promises, and I'd be really hesitant to think I could henceforth make such sweeping promises again.

So I'll agree to disagree with you on that one, and get back to book reviewing. One I've just begun is this, and it looks great:



Here's some information from the Penguin Random House page:

Quote"Merlin Sheldrake's marvelous tour of these diverse and extraordinary life forms is eye-opening on why humans should consider fungi among the greatest of earth's marvels. . . . Wondrous."--Time

A mind-bending journey into the hidden universe of fungi, "one of those rare books that can truly change the way you see the world around you" (Helen Macdonald, author of H Is for Hawk).

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Time • BBC Science Focus • The Daily Mail • Geographical • The Times • The Telegraph • New Statesman • London Evening Standard • Science Friday

When we think of fungi, we likely think of mushrooms. But mushrooms are only fruiting bodies, analogous to apples on a tree. Most fungi live out of sight, yet make up a massively diverse kingdom of organisms that supports and sustains nearly all living systems. Fungi provide a key to understanding the planet on which we live, and the ways we think, feel, and behave.

In Entangled Life, the brilliant young biologist Merlin Sheldrake shows us the world from a fungal point of view, providing an exhilarating change of perspective. Sheldrake's vivid exploration takes us from yeast to psychedelics, to the fungi that range for miles underground and are the largest organisms on the planet, to those that link plants together in complex networks known as the "Wood Wide Web,"  to those that infiltrate and manipulate insect bodies with devastating precision.

Fungi throw our concepts of individuality and even intelligence into question. They are metabolic masters, earth makers, and key players in most of life's processes. They can change our minds, heal our bodies, and even help us remediate environmental disaster. By examining fungi on their own terms, Sheldrake reveals how these extraordinary organisms--and our relationships with them--are changing our understanding of how life works.

SHORTLISTED FOR THE BRITISH BOOK AWARD • LONGLISTED FOR THE RATHBONES FOLIO PRIZE

"Entangled Life is a gorgeous book of literary nature writing in the tradition of [Robert] Macfarlane and John Fowles, ripe with insight and erudition. . . . Food for the soul."--Eugenia Bone, Wall Street Journal

So far, the book is living up to the hype. If people are interested in other superb natural history books, I would also recommend:

The Future Eaters by Australian ecologist Tim Flannery - best natural history of Australia and surrounding land masses I've ever read - accessible, detailed, superbly written, total pleasure to read and so much to learn - Tim Flannery did a Literature degree before he became a biologist, and it really shows in his writing.

Where Song Began by Tim Low - amazing exploration of Australian birds, their characteristics, why they're so hyperactive and vocal (our plants make lots of excess sugar for them because there aren't enough minerals in the soil for the plants to turn all the sugars they make from photosynthesis into other useful things for their own use - such as proteins etc - so they instead use the sugar to court pollinators, and have enough to employ lots of birds to do that).
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Something else / Re: Here it is... the book thr...
Last post by SueC - October 23, 2021, 11:30:26
Quote from: Ulrich on October 22, 2021, 15:04:44
Quote from: SueC on October 22, 2021, 05:17:17Fisherman's Blues is one of my favourite albums of all time, and it was really interesting to read about its recording, especially the months in residence in Spiddal House. That all seemed pretty idyllic

Well I guess it was and even today, when the band members speak about it (or re-visit the place) they get all sentimental about it.
However, only half of the album was recorded there, the rest was all over the place (Dublin mostly, plus some sessions in L.A., which weren't used after all).
Songs kept being rearranged and re-recorded, in the end they lost track and it could've been 3 albums in all. (Most left-over recordings were subsequently released over the next 30 years.)

Yes, they covered all that in the bio!  ;)  That producer in LA gave me the creeps. I'd have walked away (but I'm mature-age and have picked up more on alarm bells than I had as a younger person, and Mike Scott was still young and impressionable). The big American flag draped across his house was already a clue as to what you were going to get.

I've had Too Close To Heaven for many years, and I like some of the material on it even better than the material on Fisherman's Blues. And yet from what I read in the bio, that's only a fraction of what they actually recorded and then put on ice (although some of it turned up on Room To Roam, whether from the vault or re-recorded specifically for that album I'm not sure). Looks like I need to do some more digging. Also to try to get the B-sides for Dream Harder - which I had no idea existed.

Other than that I'm pretty much up to date with what I want out of that catalogue - I'm yet to acquire Still Burning (last time I looked it wasn't available) and Modern Blues, which would mean a complete catalogue up until that particular album, and after that I'm not so sure I'm interested anymore. It's starting to look samey after that and there's other back catalogues I'm still filling gaps in...


Quote from: Ulrich on October 22, 2021, 15:04:44I had the impression that Mike Scott just follows his own intuition when it came to creative decisions. This lead him to into "blind alleys" at times, but that can easily happen.

Anyway, I read that autobiography by Mike Scott a while ago and enjoyed it. He's a good writer, hopefully during lockdowns he found time to write something again (part 2 of this bio maybe)...

Yeah, I think Part 2 would be interesting. Brett, of course, after The Withering Letter, thinks Mike Scott should give up music altogether and make a career change into spoken-word projects, like audio books.

But he's also, for the last couple of days, several times a day exclaimed in shocked tones, "He sacked Sharon Shannon! How can anyone sack Sharon Shannon?" Yesterday it was the first thing he said after he woke up in the morning. :rofl

By the way, I listened to Room To Roam a couple of times since yesterday (much outdoors work to do) and it's not actually as bad an album as either the critics or Mike Scott himself suggests. About half the tracks on it I like very much, either for the lyrics or for the music - sometimes just for one, like Further Up, Further In - the last four lines are particularly sage, and I first took note of those in my 20s:

I find I've wandered far from home
but home is in me wherever I roam
I thought I was an hour or a year behind
but the hours and the years are only time


Of course, the cynical part of me thinks How Long Will I Love You? is another hormonal proclamation by a starry-eyed courting individual, which smells vaguely fishy, and will smell worse a year later (same sort of reaction with songs like this documented previously :winking_tongue ).

I think the main problem with this album is that it's the closest The Waterboys ever got to sounding twee - in fact, they probably crossed that line with several songs on it. This was not a problem on Fisherman's Blues, or on Too Close To Heaven - or on any other albums from that catalogue that I've heard. It's a problem with some aspects of traditional music that the better trad artists, like Capercaillie, seem to have been capable of avoiding for their entire careers, while many of the general offerings you hear on St Patrick's Day are infested with it.

But Room To Roam isn't nearly as twee in its most twee places as those general St Patrick's Day offerings - and there's another way to look at it, which is: Mike Scott seems to have been a bit like a big sponge keenly soaking up the surrounding environment and culture wherever he went - particularly the West of Ireland, New York, the Findhorn intentional community - and he always produced incredible musical postcards of those places and experiences. He wasn't a tourist, he actually became a local in those places. If you spend enough time in the West of Ireland, I'm sure some of the twee starts not to look twee to you, just as cynicism doesn't look so cynical if you live in New York! ;)

And when he was looking back at Room To Roam from the context of living in New York, he could suddenly see the twee aspects of it because of the contrast in cultures, and it seems to have embarrassed him, the way he writes about it. Plus he's a perfectionist and often looks very critically at his own work, probably more critically than anyone else, backstage.

He also wrote rather critically about the New York album Dream Harder as being faux rock'n'roll, but I actually enjoy that record for its quirkiness and think it has many redeeming features, and many super songs on it. I love Glastonbury Song, the tongue-in-cheek Corn Circles and Spiritual City and the sublime version of Love and Death, for example. He thinks his mojo was at half-mast for that record, and was happier with the subsequent B-sides, which is why I'd like to hear those B-sides...

I'd totally also be up for reading the sequel for life 40+ for Mike Scott, so yeah, I hope he's been writing during the pandemic, but maybe he hasn't because he's busy juggling parenting young children and being civil with various exes... :winking_tongue
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Other Artists / Re: Currently Listening to
Last post by Ulrich - October 22, 2021, 17:12:24
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Something else / Re: Here it is... the book thr...
Last post by Ulrich - October 22, 2021, 15:04:44
Quote from: SueC on October 22, 2021, 05:17:17Fisherman's Blues is one of my favourite albums of all time, and it was really interesting to read about its recording, especially the months in residence in Spiddal House. That all seemed pretty idyllic

Well I guess it was and even today, when the band members speak about it (or re-visit the place) they get all sentimental about it.
However, only half of the album was recorded there, the rest was all over the place (Dublin mostly, plus some sessions in L.A., which weren't used after all).
Songs kept being rearranged and re-recorded, in the end they lost track and it could've been 3 albums in all. (Most left-over recordings were subsequently released over the next 30 years.)

Quote from: SueC on October 22, 2021, 05:17:17Mike Scott seems not to have consulted the other band members democratically and inclusively with major decisions like this

A bit like with Robert Smith, he seems to be "the boss" of the project. (It has been known that The Cure democratically decided which songs to put on some albums, but in general it is Robert who makes most decisions.)
I had the impression that Mike Scott just follows his own intuition when it came to creative decisions. This lead him to into "blind alleys" at times, but that can easily happen.

Anyway, I read that autobiography by Mike Scott a while ago and enjoyed it. He's a good writer, hopefully during lockdowns he found time to write something again (part 2 of this bio maybe)...
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Other Artists / Re: Nice interviews to read
Last post by Ulrich - October 22, 2021, 14:08:18
Didn't really know where to put this, but it's (kind of) an interview with Mogwai producer Dave Fridman about work on their latest album:

Quote from: undefinedDespite the challenges of producing the album remotely, Dave Fridmann's work on the latest Mogwai album saw the band top the charts for the very first time.

"Mogwai is one of those bands that's ultra‑dynamic, that goes from ear‑bleeding volume to deafening silence. If you go to one of their shows you'll experience a full range of emotions because of those dynamics, and because it's so visceral when they're loud. My job was to try to make the visceral experience of a live concert come out of a pair of stereo speakers, or tiny computer speakers, or earbuds. That's not an easy task.

"In general, it is why I have bands come into my studio and perform their music here, and I'm in the room with them listening, experiencing their music in the way they experience it. I'm not sitting in the control room. When you do that with Mogwai, it's absolutely mesmerising. Capturing that is not as simple as just recording them straight. There's studio trickery involved in getting that across on a home stereo system. I hope that I can bring some added value to the table here, not only with Mogwai, but in working with anybody."

In these two paragraphs Dave Fridmann summarises many of the essential aspects of his production and mix work on the latest Mogwai album, As The Love Continues.

Fridmann has worked with Mogwai off and on since the band's second album, 1999's Come On Die Young. He also worked on the follow up, Rock Action (2001), and again on their ninth album, Every Country's Sun (2017), and most recently on As The Love Continues. The latter, which went to number one in the UK (the band's first chart‑topping effort), came into being in a rather unusual way. Fridmann directed the recording sessions via Zoom, which may seems like a rather remote, impersonal, digital approach for someone so fond of the warmth and humanity of analogue gear. However, while countless people the world over are by now absolutely fed up of relating to others via a screen, the American has a different perspective.

"I'd actually argue that even as Zoom is a digital format, it's an analogue experience. We were looking at each other in real time. We were hearing each other in real time. We were interacting in real time. I couldn't pause reality. It was just like being in the room together. If we had been sitting in the room together, we'd have had the same conversations.

https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/inside-track-mogwai-love-continues?utm
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Other Artists / Re: Currently Listening to
Last post by Ulrich - October 22, 2021, 11:28:13
Is it really 45 years old already?

(Produced by Nick "liar" Lowe btw.) ;)
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