robert smith russian interview [robert about smart phones and social media]

Started by japanesebaby, June 05, 2012, 15:23:37

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Ikissedyoursmile

Well when youre not brought up with all the gadgets you know you dont really need them. I dont even carry my phone around with me. Its nice to have while youre driving incase your car stops working tho ;) i  got rid of my fb account too. i got so addicted to castleville,lol

PicturesOfYou

Quote from: dsanchez on September 21, 2012, 09:53:18
People doing long waiting lines to buy the newest iPhone. The world must be really a fucked up place if a little expensive machine equals happiness.



Unfortunately the world IS a really fucked up place...
when I see all those people outside the Apple stores on TV I feel sick for them  :( :smth009
There's nothing left but hope...

"Studiare, capire e lavorare sodo per cambiare il mondo"

Ulrich

Oh my, some people stand in long lines to get an Iphone or JK Rowling's new book...
Different people have different needs!
Some people even travel across Europe to see the Cure! (Which I done too at times, other people might find this unnecessary, ridiculous etc.)
It doesn't touch me at all...

dsanchez

Quote from: Ulrich on September 29, 2012, 10:16:14
Different people have different needs! Some people even travel across Europe to see the Cure! (Which I done too at times, other people might find this unnecessary, ridiculous etc.)


a colleague at work couldn't believe when I payed more than 100 £ to see The Cure at the RAH last year.  Of course people have different needs. But I think there's a difference between passionate of the music and passionate of a toy. Not that I think I am a better because of that.

i remember your compatriot Nietzsche once said "life without music is an error". Hopefully, I have not heard of anyone saying something like that of an iPhone ;)
2019.06.08 Dublin
2019.07.04 Novi Sad
2019.07.17 Athens

MeltingMan

Quote from: japanesebaby on June 05, 2012, 15:23:37I grew up in the days when to call someone, you had to go out and get to the phone booth. And it was supposed to be an important cause - otherwise why would you overcome these half a kilometer before the end of the street to make a f****** phone call?
It's strange from today's perspective, but it's true. We had no phone until 1990 and I remember
that I lost a girlfriend a year earlier because I was reluctant to call her from a phone booth. :oops:
Meanwhile I have a simple mobile phone without the previously mentioned smart functions.
People just love to communicate, but I still have my doubts about fb and others.
« Hors du temps » devise mystique, exagérée,
seulement décorative; « hors de son temps »
excellente formule qui exprime non la comba-
tivité, mais le désintéressement de l'éphéme-
ride.

(La science de l'amour, Éd. 1911, p. 296.)

dsanchez

2019.06.08 Dublin
2019.07.04 Novi Sad
2019.07.17 Athens

SueC

Aaargh, I'm years late for this, where have half these people gone? Such an interesting discussion!   :)

Quote from: japanesebaby on June 09, 2012, 13:53:55yeah, and not just technology but material things in general. 
reminds me of a newspaper column (written by a finnish author) that i recently read, about how the problem/tragedy of modern man is not that we love material things too much (as if often said). it's not some "war" between material and spiritual things, where spiritual is good and material is bad. it's actually quite the opposite: because we don't love material things enough.

because if we really did love material objects, then we'd respect them more because we'd understand their value. we'd be more grateful for what we have, instead of complaining about what we don't have (unfortunately our modern society encourages us to complain, instead of being grateful).

we constantly throw away perfectly good items just because we fancy getting a new and shinier one. we want to get something new, not because we need it but just because we think it'll make us feel better. we soon realize it doesn't make us feel any better and then we think: "ok, i feel bad because i love material things too much - so ok, this is bad, so now i need to stop loving material things and not care about them!". but this is a mistake, and it only goes even more wrong because this diminishes the value of everything we own, and in the end nothing has value, nothing is important. and we end up feeling even worse.

but the good news is that we can always become aware of this mental trap and change our attitude. that's what matters!


Agree completely.

Here's something nice: Kintsugi



The philosophy behind it not only values objects and sees them as worthy of repair - it also considers the faultlines beautiful, and by metaphor, says scars aren't ugly things, but things of value.

Re the phones - yeah, both of us here are delayed adopters of some technologies, and avoiders of others, and neither of us are compulsive upgraders.  I don't have a smartphone and Brett only has a very basic version of one because he occasionally needs to check website layouts in smartphone format for design work.  Both of us don't carry our phones around with us - they are in the house, although we will take them when going to town.  Neither of us are interested in being "on call" 24/7, which seems to surprise some people - when they email or sms and don't get an instant reaction.  It's like some people are offended when you're not available to them at the drop of a hat, but I certainly have no intentions of being so, even for business, and I don't want to encourage that kind of entitled thinking and lack of organisation and respect either.

We don't want to be attached to some kind of electronic ball and chain, and to be pursued by calls or messages all day long.  It's nice to go for a walk and know nobody can disturb you.  Or to work in peace and quiet.

The Internet is largely a cesspool, but also a fantastic resource, if you avoid the crappy bits, which is easy enough.  I love the "enormous library" aspect of it, and the ability to have international friendship groups, like penpals on steroids!  Also, that it's harder for information to be suppressed when ordinary people are more interconnected internationally, and talking to each other (although we've seen the flipside of that with the spread of conspiracy theories and misinformation on social media etc).

Also, I met my husband online!  :)  Needles in haystacks are easier to find that way. ♥
SueC is time travelling

SueC

On this subject:  This did the rounds and we love it!



We're both totally like the Programmers/Engineers here.  True to type, as one of us is a programmer and the other a science brain. :P
SueC is time travelling