Hi from a new member

Started by Pongo, August 19, 2021, 08:44:22

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Pongo

Hello!
I haven't been a member of a nice forum for a while. So I thought maybe a Cure related forum would suit nicely as I'm currently listening a lot to their oeuvre. I first heard the Cure in 1985 and really got into the band with Kiss me, Kiss me, Kiss me.
I'm from Sweden, spending my days working from home due to the pandemic.
Will be fun to engage in the discussions.

dsanchez

welcome to curefans! where do you live in Sweden if I may ask? Lovely country, been to Stockholm a few times :)
2019.06.08 Dublin
2019.07.04 Novi Sad
2019.07.17 Athens

SueC

Hullo @Pongo, and welcome!

In an ideal world, Swedish is one of the languages I would learn, along with Icelandic, Japanese and Swahili. We don't live in an ideal world but maybe you could occasionally drop in a Swedish word or two so we can learn a little by osmosis!  :)

Looking forward to having you in the conversations.  :cool
SueC is time travelling

Ulrich

It doesn't touch me at all...

Pongo

Thanks for the warm welcome! @dsanchez , @SueC  and @Ulrich

Quote from: dsanchez on August 20, 2021, 00:01:08welcome to curefans! where do you live in Sweden if I may ask? Lovely country, been to Stockholm a few times :)
I live in Stockholm since birth but is going to move to a smalltown an hour away in October. I recommend visiting in Summer, if anyone feels inclined to come here.

Quote from: SueC on August 20, 2021, 00:49:11In an ideal world, Swedish is one of the languages I would learn, along with Icelandic, Japanese and Swahili. We don't live in an ideal world but maybe you could occasionally drop in a Swedish word or two so we can learn a little by osmosis!  :)

Looking forward to having you in the conversations.  :cool

Nice that there are people interested in languages here. It is one of my passions. Can't help you much with those languages, although Icelandic is remotely intelligible to a Swedish person. Though it is trickier than Norwegian and Danish, which are nearly dialects of Swedish. I have a rudimentary understanding of French and can get by reasonably well in German. Would very much like to know more languages.


Språkskolan börjar nu:  - Det skulle vara lätt för mig att säga att jag inte hittar hem men det gör jag, tror jag.

Quote from: Ulrich on August 20, 2021, 10:07:05Welcome, Pongo!

Quote from: Pongo on August 19, 2021, 08:44:22I first heard the Cure in 1985

Me too!  :cool

I'm rather sure I saw a feature of the making of the video for Inbetween days on the obsolete TV channel Music Box when I was on a skiing holiday. It got me interested.

Ulrich

Quote from: Pongo on August 26, 2021, 09:40:19I'm rather sure I saw a feature of the making of the video for Inbetween days on the obsolete TV channel Music Box when I was on a skiing holiday.

Sounds intriguing, must look if there's anything on youtube today...

Was it this?
It doesn't touch me at all...

Pongo


SueC

Quote from: Pongo on August 26, 2021, 09:40:19Nice that there are people interested in languages here. It is one of my passions. Can't help you much with those languages, although Icelandic is remotely intelligible to a Swedish person. Though it is trickier than Norwegian and Danish, which are nearly dialects of Swedish. I have a rudimentary understanding of French and can get by reasonably well in German. Would very much like to know more languages.

Språkskolan börjar nu:  - Det skulle vara lätt för mig att säga att jag inte hittar hem men det gör jag, tror jag.

Thank goodness for Google Translate!  :winking_tongue  What do you mean, you could say you can't find home but you do?

Hearing Swedish or Danish I can sometimes hear a little bit of German in it and "almost" get some of it, but it's not quite as similar to German as Dutch. ...in Australia we have a TV channel called SBS on which we can watch original-language, subtitled movies and series from all over the world; it's language heaven! Also we watched the Swedish, subtitled production of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (Män Som Hatar Kvinnor) which was very good...and some Danish stuff, like Anna Pihl which happened to be showing here. I expect even if it's not that great if you're a native speaker, non-speaker language nutters are going to find international stuff interesting just for the language and cultural bits and pieces.

...and I looove the Danish novel Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow...

It might surprise you to learn that my husband and I go hiking in Denmark about twice a month.  :angel  ...because one of the coastal towns near us is called Denmark. Since hiking makes me very happy, I tend to write up particularly "new" hiking expeditions on our Happy today because thread, and you can find our most recent expedition to Denmark here!

If you like to hike etc, personally I love seeing pictures from other parts of the world, from other members of forums - before CF I came from a very social and less niche forum where posting lots of interesting outdoors pictures, craft etc etc was the norm. I'm sure I shocked a few people here by bringing that custom with me. ;) But, I think it makes things so much more fun when people will do this. @Ulrich, for instance, is a historical buff who loves castles and old architecture - something I love too but we don't have much of in Australia, and I get vicarious tours of stuff like that from him. We could look up all the pictures in the world online, but to me - well, I prefer the context of being shown around by a local, and someone I can interact with!  :)

My favourite children's book series author when I was growing up was Swedish - and no, it wasn't Pippi Långstrump, although that was pretty cool too, especially when she used egg as natural shampoo/conditioner (which does actually work, it's a hippie thing) - when that was on TV, of course my parents thought she was a bad example and a bad influence because of unconventional things like this, and because Pippi was so independent (and this went against all the gender stereotypes my parents subscribed to, and the idea of children as too stupid to offer anything of use etc). So anyway, I had to go watch Pippi at my friend's house, whose parents laughed when they caught snippets of it and enjoyed our enjoyment of it!  :)

I may be a tiny little bit related to you, because I have a little bit of Viking DNA!  :smth023

Looking forward to learning stuff from you!  :cool
SueC is time travelling

Pongo

Quote from: SueC on August 27, 2021, 10:56:49Thank goodness for Google Translate!  :winking_tongue  What do you mean, you could say you can't find home but you do?
Yes. It's a song title that came to mind. It reads exactly: It would be easy for me to say that I can't find my way home but I can, I think.

All of our foreign language television is subtitled. That's one reason Swedish people in general understand English very well. A funny thing is that I, as well as many I know, keep reading the subtitles even if we understand what's being said. It's like a habit that you can't shake off. And it makes you spot whenever the translators have made a mistake.

Quote from: SueC on August 27, 2021, 10:56:49..and I looove the Danish novel Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow...
I read it many years ago, can't remember much. Maybe I should read it again.

Quote from: SueC on August 27, 2021, 10:56:49It might surprise you to learn that my husband and I go hiking in Denmark about twice a month.

Denmark looks beautiful. Will share pics of my hikes. Now it's mushroom season so we're hoping to find some time during the weekend to get out into the woods. We'll be moving in October so we have to spend most of the free time packing and arranging things, but there must be some time to get out as well.

Quote from: SueC on August 27, 2021, 10:56:49@Ulrich, for instance, is a historical buff who loves castles and old architecture - something I love too but we don't have much of in Australia, and I get vicarious tours of stuff like that from him.

We have our share of that stuff around here as well. There are also a great deal of rock carvings and rune stones where we are usually going on our hikes. The rune stones are rather fascinating pieces of art. But what is written on them are usually utterly boring. They normally start off with the rune alphabet, then almost invariably they say things like: "Halvbjörn erected this stone in honour of his fallen brother Enar, who had a large boat, God help his soul".

Quote from: SueC on August 27, 2021, 10:56:49My favourite children's book series author when I was growing up was Swedish - and no, it wasn't Pippi Långstrump
I have had my problems with Pippi as well. I kind of liked that she could do whatever she wanted to do but she mostly did silly things with that freedom. And she's sometimes respectless for no reason at all. My parents thought it was a good read for me even though it wasn't exactly what they were trying to teach me. They had more the approach that it is fine to do whatever you want to when you have shown that you know what the best thing to do is and when you can take responsibility for your actions.
Anyway, there are other of Astrid Lindgren's characters that I like more. And less. Karlsson is an awful bully.

Quote from: SueC on August 27, 2021, 10:56:49I may be a tiny little bit related to you, because I have a little bit of Viking DNA!  :smth023

Who knows :) My father did a bit of genealogy but it ends in the early 19th century. Interestingly enough with a king involved...
I have some long distance family in Perth. And that's the only connection to your country that I have. Haven't visited yet.

Quote from: SueC on August 27, 2021, 10:56:49Looking forward to learning stuff from you!  :cool

Maybe I can teach you how to say:
Sju sjösjuka sjömän sköttes av sju sköna sjuksköterskor.

And until the next time, you can try and figure out what this means:
Far, får får får? Nej, får får inte får, får får lamm. ;)

SueC

Quote from: Pongo on August 27, 2021, 15:21:19All of our foreign language television is subtitled. That's one reason Swedish people in general understand English very well. A funny thing is that I, as well as many I know, keep reading the subtitles even if we understand what's being said. It's like a habit that you can't shake off. And it makes you spot whenever the translators have made a mistake.

Years ago I met a Dutch woman who'd emigrated to Australia, who had a distinct American accent. She says it's because she learnt English mostly by watching American films!  :-D


Quote from: Pongo on August 27, 2021, 15:21:19Denmark looks beautiful. Will share pics of my hikes. Now it's mushroom season so we're hoping to find some time during the weekend to get out into the woods. We'll be moving in October so we have to spend most of the free time packing and arranging things, but there must be some time to get out as well.

Are you looking forward to moving away from the city? Was it a deliberate decision - like a "tree change"? We made a deliberate move onto a smallholding ten years ago and it's very peaceful. Also a better place to be in a pandemic!

Looking forward to some pictures of Swedish countryside.  :cool  Good luck with mushrooming - I was born in Europe and did my primary school education there; mushrooming was big where I went to school, with several classmates coming from families "in the know" about where the good stands were etc - and of course, which ones to eat and which ones to avoid.

Once I asked an adult there, "Which mushrooms are edible?" and got the reply, "All of them; some only once!"  :angel


Quote from: Pongo on August 27, 2021, 15:21:19We have our share of that stuff around here as well. There are also a great deal of rock carvings and rune stones where we are usually going on our hikes. The rune stones are rather fascinating pieces of art. But what is written on them are usually utterly boring. They normally start off with the rune alphabet, then almost invariably they say things like: "Halvbjörn erected this stone in honour of his fallen brother Enar, who had a large boat, God help his soul".

Well, my husband and I had a good laugh at that inscription!  :lol:

It is possible that rune stones are more enjoyable if you can't read them and are only looking at them aesthetically. Unless of course, inscriptions like this tickle your sense of humour!


Quote from: Pongo on August 27, 2021, 15:21:19I have had my problems with Pippi as well. I kind of liked that she could do whatever she wanted to do but she mostly did silly things with that freedom. And she's sometimes respectless for no reason at all. My parents thought it was a good read for me even though it wasn't exactly what they were trying to teach me. They had more the approach that it is fine to do whatever you want to when you have shown that you know what the best thing to do is and when you can take responsibility for your actions.

It sounds like your parents had an intelligent attitude to parenting. Yes, Pippi isn't a paragon of virtue, she's flawed, but she's also got good sides and makes children laugh. In some ways she's a bit like Mr Bean. The audience is aware that we should not behave like him.  :beaming-face 

About this bit you said: "...she mostly did silly things with that freedom. And she's sometimes respectless for no reason at all."

It made me think about how that also applied to quite a few characters in my parents' favourite programme at the time, in the early 1980s: Dallas:1f631:  Seems like some people accept questionable behaviour in adults that they wouldn't accept in children, which I've never thought fair at any stage of my life span to date.

In retrospect too I have to laugh at some of my father's decisions about what literature was fit for me to read. I enjoyed reading in general from a young age, print and graphic both. There were some incredibly intelligent and intricate comic books like the Italian/German Donald Duck/Uncle Scrooge books with the little nephews as the conscience in the stories. I actually learnt a fair bit of basic history and geography from these between age 6 and 10 - they'd re-tell historical stuff with the Disney characters - and a wry, satirical edge I noticed and appreciated more when I was older.

And of course there was Asterix - still love those. Anyway, when I was 9 I was told I was now too old for picture stories like this, and I needed to read something serious - and my father got me a subscription to Reader's Digest - that thing you can buy at the supermarket checkout, which is full of sensationalised stories of disasters, and neoliberal propaganda, and has a reading age not exceeding 10 even though it's allegedly aimed at adults. I think it was a step backwards from Donald Duck and Asterix.  :1f635:

Graphic novels can be pretty thought-provoking too - like Maus or Death The High Cost Of Living.


Quote from: Pongo on August 27, 2021, 15:21:19Anyway, there are other of Astrid Lindgren's characters that I like more. And less. Karlsson is an awful bully.

I never liked Karlsson, and neither did my kid friend at the time.


Quote from: Pongo on August 27, 2021, 15:21:19Maybe I can teach you how to say:
Sju sjösjuka sjömän sköttes av sju sköna sjuksköterskor.

And until the next time, you can try and figure out what this means:
Far, får får får? Nej, får får inte får, får får lamm. ;)

So the kid is asking if sheep have sheep, and the father says they have lambs, but there's some other word play I am missing! Which you can perhaps fill me in on!

Nice tongue twister about the seasick sailors!  :cool

Have you tried saying, Red leather, yellow leather, red leather, yellow leather (and repeat this!) really fast?  :angel

And there's:
She sells seashells by the seashore.
I want a cup of coffee from a proper copper coffee pot. If I can't have a cup of coffee from a proper copper coffee pot, I want a cup of tea.


German ones:

In Ulm und um Ulm herum.
Fischers Fritz fischt frische Fische; frische Fische fischt Fischers Fritz.


:winking_tongue
SueC is time travelling

Pongo

Quote from: SueC on August 28, 2021, 11:41:11Years ago I met a Dutch woman who'd emigrated to Australia, who had a distinct American accent. She says it's because she learnt English mostly by watching American films!  :-D

Many people here are speaking English with a pseudo American accent, surely mostly because of the content they consume. When I grew up we were taught the British (RP, in effect) pronunciation, now you are allowed to choose between British and American in School. I prefer the British but I'm not trying to sound British in particular. I guess it's easy to hear the Swedish sounds coming through.
The fact is that I probably speak more English than Swedish these days. 95% of work conversation is in English. I speak mostly English with my girlfriend, who is German. She is fluent in Swedish but we have sort of decided that English is our language. Sometimes though, it's an unholy mix of English, German and Swedish. Invariably, though, we speak Swedish with the dog.

Quote from: SueC on August 28, 2021, 11:41:11Are you looking forward to moving away from the city? Was it a deliberate decision - like a "tree change"? We made a deliberate move onto a smallholding ten years ago and it's very peaceful. Also a better place to be in a pandemic!


Yes, it's deliberate. The main reason is that the house we are living in now is going to renovated. That will imply moving to another flat during the renovation. It is uncertain for how long. And, unfortunately, some of the tennants have not agreed to the renovation, which means it is a matter for a tribunal to decide. When that will take place is still undecided. Meanwhile, the owners of the house will start the renovation of the exterior of the building. There is also major construction work due to start on a nearby railway line. All in all we're looking at moving chaos and living in the middle of construction for years to come.

So we decided to move. The housing market in Stockholm is terrible. Finding a place to rent is a full time job and it may last for years, unless you are willing to rent second hand or find yourself in an unattractive or dodgy area, or a place with poor communication. The option is to take out a loan and buy something. But we can't see ourselves maxing our budget and buy something that is half good. So we started looking outside the main Stockholm area.

We have a summer cottage near the smalltown Enköping, so we started looking there. And we found a quirky flat in the middle of town that is special enough for us to decide to get it. The price we paid for it would get us a rather boring flat in a suburb. Prices for flats are ridiculous in Stockholm.

So that was the necessity reason. I also feel that I don't really need to live in the city. Yes, I enjoy going to the odd concert, sports event or eat at a nice restaurant every now and then. The good thing is that I'll still be able to do all that. My girlfriend will be commuting to work daily, and me maybe a couple of times per month (we'll see about that, I haven't been to the office since March 2020). I also have children from a previous relationship, and I'll have to pick them up a couple of times per month. That should, at least in theory, work just as well as it is doing now.

Maybe we won't like the smalltown. Then we can always move back. We'll see. I'm optimistic.

Quote from: SueC on August 28, 2021, 11:41:11Looking forward to some pictures of Swedish countryside.
I'll post it elsewhere. I can say that it was a success. This year there are mushrooms everywhere.

Quote from: SueC on August 28, 2021, 11:41:11It is possible that rune stones are more enjoyable if you can't read them and are only looking at them aesthetically. Unless of course, inscriptions like this tickle your sense of humour!

You are right. If you are lucky they contain laconic descriptions of how the person died. But what is more interesting most stones where raised after christianity had come to these lands and sometimes there are hidden pagan messages carved as well. Like 'Thor rules!', or something to that extent.

Quote from: SueC on August 28, 2021, 11:41:11It sounds like your parents had an intelligent attitude to parenting.
It may sound that way, yes. In some regards, not in others. Let's leave it at that for the time being ;)
My choice of reading or films to see was never anything they interfered with much. They trusted my judgement and didn't really believe that you would become a bad person for reading something.

You didn't say who the Swedish author that you liked was.

Quote from: SueC on August 28, 2021, 11:41:11Have you tried saying, Red leather, yellow leather, red leather, yellow leather (and repeat this!) really fast?  :angel

I have now :) Need more coffee for that.

Quote from: SueC on August 28, 2021, 11:41:11So the kid is asking if sheep have sheep, and the father says they have lambs, but there's some other word play I am missing! Which you can perhaps fill me in on!

Bang on!

Will practice the german ones and show them off to my girlfriend.

SueC

Quote from: Pongo on August 31, 2021, 09:43:23Many people here are speaking English with a pseudo American accent, surely mostly because of the content they consume. When I grew up we were taught the British (RP, in effect) pronunciation, now you are allowed to choose between British and American in School. I prefer the British but I'm not trying to sound British in particular. I guess it's easy to hear the Swedish sounds coming through.

The Swedish-English accent is endearing though - as is Swedish itself... :winking_tongue


...and that's not what most people think about the German-English accent, modelled here:


Here's some more fun stuff to share with your German partner (if you've not already seen it):





Quote from: Pongo on August 31, 2021, 09:43:23The fact is that I probably speak more English than Swedish these days. 95% of work conversation is in English. I speak mostly English with my girlfriend, who is German. She is fluent in Swedish but we have sort of decided that English is our language. Sometimes though, it's an unholy mix of English, German and Swedish. Invariably, though, we speak Swedish with the dog.

At our house, we only speak English. Brett doesn't have any other languages, except C, Python, Cobol, Pascal, Javascript, Java, HTML, CSS, LaTeX, BASIC, Rust, etc, which are no use for conversing in. However, he says he is also fluent in Gibberish and Pig Latin.

Also, he sometimes greatly entertains me, and German-speaking guests when we have them, by giving a reading from Das Grosse Menü, a classic German cookbook full of traditional recipes like Gebackener Kalbskopf ("...das Hirn müssen Sie separat kaufen..." :1f62e:), Labskaus, Honigkuchen and Hexenhaus. As he unwittingly superimposes English pronunciation rules onto phonetic German, and gives rather dramatic performances in his very formal BBC voice, his readings have everyone who has any clue how German should be pronounced in stitches.  :lol:


Quote from: Pongo on August 31, 2021, 09:43:23...All in all we're looking at moving chaos and living in the middle of construction for years to come.

So we decided to move. The housing market in Stockholm is terrible. Finding a place to rent is a full time job and it may last for years, unless you are willing to rent second hand or find yourself in an unattractive or dodgy area, or a place with poor communication. The option is to take out a loan and buy something. But we can't see ourselves maxing our budget and buy something that is half good. So we started looking outside the main Stockholm area.

We have a summer cottage near the smalltown Enköping, so we started looking there. And we found a quirky flat in the middle of town that is special enough for us to decide to get it. The price we paid for it would get us a rather boring flat in a suburb. Prices for flats are ridiculous in Stockholm.

So that was the necessity reason. I also feel that I don't really need to live in the city. Yes, I enjoy going to the odd concert, sports event or eat at a nice restaurant every now and then. The good thing is that I'll still be able to do all that. My girlfriend will be commuting to work daily, and me maybe a couple of times per month (we'll see about that, I haven't been to the office since March 2020). I also have children from a previous relationship, and I'll have to pick them up a couple of times per month. That should, at least in theory, work just as well as it is doing now.

Maybe we won't like the smalltown. Then we can always move back. We'll see. I'm optimistic.

Good luck with all of that!  :)  I'd not want to stay in the city with all that renovation drama going on either; this seems like a good opportunity for trying out a different kind of life. Is there good public transport to Stockholm from Enköping?

Even though we are "in the sticks" and there's no through traffic out here, only frog calls at night, we live 25 minutes by car from a regional centre on the coast which has most things we need, including concerts of various genres, especially during Arts Festival season. We don't get large gigs with audiences in the thousands - for that, you need to travel to Perth, four hours away. Turns out The Cure were up there in 2016, and we were completely oblivious, because we were finishing the exterior plastering on our house at the time. Owner building is like that - it's like you're in a completely different universe, with a vastly different sense of time too.  :1f636:


Quote from: Pongo on August 31, 2021, 09:43:23You didn't say who the Swedish author that you liked was.

It's very niche - she wrote the only series of children's books with horses in them I've ever come across that's not mentally unbalanced and twee, though you may not glean this from the cover illustrations. Her name is Lisbeth Pahnke, of Britta & Silver fame. Her series is about people, landscapes and traditions as much as it is about working with horses, and later on, working with children and horses in a riding school. She wrote with a lot of understanding of humans, equines and other animals; with great intelligence and humour. I learnt a lot from reading these books, which are largely autobiographical, and loved the cultural details about life in Scandinavia. I read the German translation (sadly it's never been translated into English) from about age 8 on, and continued to re-read it periodically as an adult, sort of like All Creatures Great And Small.

Lisbeth Pahnke is still around and we occasionally send each other emails and cards (I left a guest entry on her website ten years ago, after accidentally stumbling across it looking for possible sequels, to thank her for writing the series, and got a lovely unexpected email). She lives in rural south Sweden and second last time I heard from her, she was very worried about the pandemic, and about not being able to see her grandchildren. I was glad to have a card from her last Christmas that she's OK - it's not fun being an older person especially, during COVID-19, and she wasn't happy about the laissez-faire approach to it in Sweden.

By the way, just by coincidence there was a reading of Pippi Longstocking on the ABC Radio National Science Show this week! They did it as a teaser for Astrid Lindgren's apparent connection with science somewhere, which I had no idea about and which the next show promises to go into.


I have another question about: Far, får får får? Nej, får får inte får, får får lamm.

So I got the meaning, but I wondered about the significance of the word repetitions for får. Is it simply like the usage in, "Many, many, many moons ago..." or is there something more complicated going on?
SueC is time travelling

Pongo

Quote from: SueC on September 02, 2021, 03:14:22Brett doesn't have any other languages, except C, Python, Cobol, Pascal, Javascript, Java, HTML, CSS, LaTeX, BASIC, Rust, etc,
I would very much like to master one of these. I have enough of a few of these to get my job done but without continually referencing stackoverflow, I would have had to hand everything over to a real developer.

Can't think of a better ambassador than the Swedish chef (maybe I can, come to think of it), although he, for some reason, is Danish in Germany.

Quote from: SueC on September 02, 2021, 03:14:22Good luck with all of that!  :)  I'd not want to stay in the city with all that renovation drama going on either; this seems like a good opportunity for trying out a different kind of life. Is there good public transport to Stockholm from Enköping?
Thanks. The communications are good. The train will take you to Stockholm city centre in 45 minutes. There are some other options as well. Of course, there is a time when the trains stop running, so planning will be needed.

Quote from: SueC on September 02, 2021, 03:14:22...only frog calls at night,
Sounds nice. We were thinking about moving to the real sticks as well but soon came to the conclusion that we still want town life and the summer cottage will serve that purpose whenever we need that. I have actually another summer cottage on the west coast together with my siblings. So there are ample possibilities for getting away. And I haven't mentioned the van we converted into a camper last year...

The name Lisbetth Pahnke didn't ring any bells, but when I saw the book covers, I know I have seen these. I was never the target group for these, so I didn't read them when I was younger. I took a uni course in children's literature. But I can't remember that that name came up there. It certainly wasn't on the reading list. But that was a long time ago.

Astrid Lindgren and science sounds interesting. I haven't heard of that connection either. Will have to check what that is about.

Quote from: SueC on September 02, 2021, 03:14:22So I got the meaning, but I wondered about the significance of the word repetitions for får. Is it simply like the usage in, "Many, many, many moons ago..." or is there something more complicated going on?

The main pun here is that får means sheep and also is the present tense of the verb , which means to get. So in direct translation:
Far, får får får - Father (far is short form of fader), [do] get sheep sheep (extra pun here in the translation as get is the swedish word for goat :) pronounced yeet)
Nej, får får inte får, får får lamm - No, sheep get not sheep, sheep get lambs.