Author Topic: Best intro ever  (Read 3320 times)

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Online dsanchez

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Best intro ever
« on: April 26, 2007, 18:44:05 »
Those who had the luck to see Roger Waters live enjoyed probably one of the best intro ever in the rock history. The combination of classic songs plus that amazing-almost-real screen was just out of this world.

From all this, one song captured my attention. It's just so f****** beautiful, and he played as intro right before his first song. It's a clasical one, with violins. The song can be heard in this video:



Any idea from who is this song?.

I asked in a Pink Floyd forum but no-one has any idea  :?
Strangers passing in the street, by chance two separate glances meet and I am you and what I see is me...


Online dsanchez

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Re: Best intro ever
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2007, 18:49:22 »
Another video of the Roger Water intro songs


Strangers passing in the street, by chance two separate glances meet and I am you and what I see is me...

Offline rjl

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Re: Best intro ever
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2007, 03:21:55 »
Wow, I was confused for a second. I had no clue that was the backdrop for a moment, and was wondering why on earth someone would film a bottle of Johnny Walker... Duh.

Anyhow, I think the best intro music was none whatsoever. NIN/Bowie '95 - the show just started out of nowhere. Out of the blue "Terrible Lie" and the show was on. I figured that I was distracted or talking to someone until the recordings started to come out, and a lot of them had "Terrible Lie" cut at the beginning!

Around here, it seems that 90% of the club shows here have used the Flaming Lips' "Yoshimi vs. The Pink Robots" for the past few years... A couple of times I've seen Marilyn Manson (I know, I know... but up until 96 or so I liked his stuff, the rest was out of habit/curiosity), he's had phenomenal "house music" - Iggy's "The ****" and the Stones "Let It Bleed", both in their entirety!

Well, in answer to your question, though, I haven't the foggiest.


Offline Steve

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Re: Best intro ever
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2007, 08:13:23 »
I have absolutely no idea what the intro music is.
It was the same when I saw him in Budapest. I was looking at the screen for about 5 minutes until I realised it was a screen & not actually a set.
A boy, did that guy chain-smoke or what?
Cheers
Steve
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Online dsanchez

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Re: Best intro ever
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2007, 18:28:09 »
The amazing song played right before "In the flesh" is Mahler's 5th symphony - 4th movement "Adagietto". It can be hear in this video:



(Roger use the part from minute 1:40)

See the complete list of intro songs used

:rocker
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Offline Steve

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Re: Best intro ever
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2007, 19:14:01 »
It was a good intro, but a bit too long really.
I remember a good intro when I was at my first Fields of The Nephilim gig in London, just before Dawnrazor came out.
I was right at the front & there was more smoke than absolutely necessary.
Harmonica man was playing & as soon as it started to fade, this "Freddy Kruger" hand shot out of the smoke causing the entire first 4 rows of people to have palpitations.
Was a startling effect without all the flashy stuff that's around these days.
 
Cheers
Steve
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Offline japanesebaby

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Re: Best intro ever
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2007, 21:46:50 »
yes i'd say it's rather long to be used as such a concert intro (the complete movement is over 11 minutes). but mahler's single movements easily spam 20 or 25 minutes... and the symphony might have four or five movements... so mahler is not something that can be picked up fast. i don't mean to say it's somehow "difficult" to listen to, i just mean it takes time to get inside his moods so his music is not at its best when clipped short or fragmented.
i think it's mahler who said something like that his symphohies had to be "like a whole world, to encompass and contain everything in them". and so the scale of his compositions is amazing: for instance, the duration of the complete 5th symphony is about 1 hour 15 minutes - and it's not even his longest one. anyway, i think he's never damn tedious like some other megalomanic guys (like wagner for instance - huh! :?) can be. mahler is enormous but graceful at the same time. a mixture of huge slow vast outstretching arching forms and amazing sense of detail all in one, cathedral-like architecture within pure delicacy of details. i know it sounds cheap-ish but i think the effect is like watching a frail little flower under the vastness of the sky over the mountain or something. the sense of dimensions is awesome and imo, no other composer ever managedthat in such a masterful way.
and haha yes i know all this makes me sound like a classical geek - well who cares. :)

i always loved mahler. even quite passionately when i was young. for the 4th movement of the 5th symphony, i remember one summer spent in my father's house in the countryside years ago when i taught myself to play the orchestral score with piano since there was no piano score/arrangement available. so i had to sight read all the orchestral parts to arrange it myself. i never learned it in full, maybe just a few pages, but at least i learned how to transpose those damn french horns and trumpets! ;)


the 4th slow movement of the 5th symphony is quite famous piece of music. it has been used several occasions on various movies and other popular occasions. sometimes i think rather cheapish-ly and doing no real justice to mahler's language of long slow streched archs. but probably the most famous and succesful example is in luchino visconti's 'film 'death in venice' where it forms an almost uninterrupted flow throughout the movie - excellent usage of music there!

ok now i'll stop boring all you people to death with some babbles about mahler. ;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._5_%28Mahler%29
« Last Edit: May 04, 2007, 22:09:44 by lostflower4 »
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Online dsanchez

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Re: Best intro ever
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2007, 23:10:28 »
yes i'd say it's rather long to be used as such a concert intro (the complete movement is over 11 minutes). but mahler's single movements easily spam 20 or 25 minutes... and the symphony might have four or five movements... so mahler is not something that can be picked up fast. i don't mean to say it's somehow "difficult" to listen to, i just mean it takes time to get inside his moods so his music is not at its best when clipped short or fragmented.

Hi jb :)

If you watch one of the videos about Roger Waters Intro I puted above, you will see that he only play about 1 minute of Mahler's 5th symphony-Adagietto :)
« Last Edit: October 21, 2008, 00:29:01 by japanesebaby »
Strangers passing in the street, by chance two separate glances meet and I am you and what I see is me...

 

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