Author Topic: Here it is... the book thread!  (Read 26702 times)

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Offline PearlThompsonsBloodflowers

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #90 on: January 08, 2018, 18:29:22 »
Currently re reading Cured. I got it for Christmas n finished it in 3 days. I am re readin it just bc I love the book so much even if I'm not huge on Lol anymore.
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Online dsanchez

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #91 on: April 03, 2018, 23:26:12 »
Watching a series in Netflix and the main character wrote some interesting stuff that is in my to-read list:

Technological Slavery: The Collected Writings of Theodore J. Kaczynski, a.k.a. “The Unabomber”

Seems something worth reading, specially for those pasted to their mobile phones everyday...
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Offline Ulrich

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #92 on: April 04, 2018, 11:13:28 »
I'm currently reading Dan Brown's "Origin".
I've never been his biggest fan, but mostly his books were "entertaining", even though the adventures of Professor Langdon always follow the same pattern: he gets into some kind of mysterious adventure, meets a woman he can drag along through secret pathways, while solving a "mystery" and on the way explaining some (religious or other) "symbols"...

Seems something worth reading...

Are you sure? The guy was probably right to be a critique of industrialization etc., but apart from that he seems a little insane...
I myself do not think it's worth reading if the guy who wrote it thinks his own writing is so important he needs to kill to get people to read it.  :roll:

From Wikipedia:
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Theodore John Kaczynski (/kəˈzɪnski/; born May 22, 1942), also known as the Unabomber, is an American domestic terrorist. A mathematics prodigy, he abandoned an academic career in 1969 to pursue a primitive lifestyle, then between 1978 and 1995 he killed three people, and injured 23 others, in a nationwide bombing campaign targeting those involved with modern technology. In conjunction, he issued a social critique opposing industrialization and advancing a nature-centered form of anarchism.

In 1995, he sent a letter to The New York Times and promised to "desist from terrorism" if the Times or The Washington Post published his manifesto, Industrial Society and Its Future, in which he argued that his bombings were extreme but necessary to attract attention to the erosion of human freedom and dignity by modern technologies that require large-scale organization.

How did you write your post btw? Using any kind of modern technology?   ;)
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Online dsanchez

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #93 on: April 04, 2018, 12:11:32 »
Are you sure? The guy was probably right to be a critique of industrialization etc., but apart from that he seems a little insane...
I myself do not think it's worth reading if the guy who wrote it thinks his own writing is so important he needs to kill to get people to read it.  :roll:

he is insane, but most genius were/are insane. Yes, I obviously disapprove his way of making his thinking known, but the few I read, I agree with. Plus the guy was subject of an experiment when he was student in Harvard, this definitely fucked him up and probably made him do the (bad) things he did.
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Offline Ulrich

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #94 on: April 04, 2018, 12:55:38 »
he is insane, but most genius were/are insane.

I know. And if you won't read my genius postings here, I'm gonna kill someone!  :x  :P  ;)

Anyway, I'm 99% certain there are better authors out there warning about industrialization, finance system and so on - only they are modest enough not to kill someone to get heard...
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Online dsanchez

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #95 on: April 04, 2018, 21:00:52 »
Anyway, I'm 99% certain there are better authors out there warning about industrialization, finance system and so on - only they are modest enough not to kill someone to get heard...

will let you know after reading ;)
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Offline Ulrich

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #96 on: April 05, 2018, 09:26:31 »
will let you know after reading ;)

Reading that after watching a series via "netflix" (!) is ... oh well you know...  :lol:

Before letting me know you should of course read other critics' works, for example:
Friedrich Georg Jünger: Die Perfektion der Technik, Frankfurt am Main: Klostermann, 8. Auflage 2010 [written in 1939!!]

Michael Adas: Machines as the Measure of Men. Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance. Cornell University Press, Ithaca NY u. a. 1990

Wolfgang Klems: Die unbewältigte Moderne. Geschichte und Kontinuität der Technikkritik. GAFB – Gesellschaft zur Förderung Arbeitsorientierter Forschung und Bildung, Frankfurt am Main 1988

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Prominente Vertreter der Technikkritik sind u. a. Friedrich Georg Jünger, Günther Anders, Jacques Ellul, und Lewis Mumford. In einem weiteren Sinn kann man auch Teile des Werks von Martin Heidegger und die kritische Technikgeschichte (David F. Noble) der Technikkritik zurechnen.
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technikskepsis

(Yes, I used google to find some info... :oops:)
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Offline MeltingMan

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #97 on: April 05, 2018, 17:26:53 »
I'm just finishing Joséphin Péladan 1858-1918 by Christophe Beaufils.
The next one will be Röda rummet by Strindberg.
Nous naissons, nous, les androgynes, l'es-
prit engrossé de quelque chose, et, arrivés à
un certain àge. notre nature demande à enfanter.

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Online chemicaloverload

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #98 on: July 15, 2018, 22:13:56 »
I landed in Espania with no books. Luckily I found a little market in a town outside of Barcelona where they had a donation stall with some English books. I picked two up and I just finished reading the first one called “nobody true” by James Herbert. I had not prepared myself for it’s content. It’s not the kind of book you read on the beach in the sun...it’s a night book, for when everyone is asleep and can’t see your face twisting as you read the words, asking you ‘good book?’ in the process, only to be met with a silent nod.

Asides from that, I recommend it. To those with a strong stomach :)
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Offline Ulrich

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #99 on: October 08, 2018, 10:46:00 »
I'm reading "Room to Dream" written by David Lynch and Kristine McKenna

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An unusual hybrid of biography and memoir, Room to Dream alternates chapters by each writer. First, co-author McKenna supplies a conventional biographical account of Lynch’s life, reported through conversations with his family members, his friends from childhood to the present day, and such collaborators and supporters as Kyle MacLachlan, Laura Dern, and Naomi Watts; then Lynch responds to that material in chapters that read like transcribed and lightly edited interviews.

Room to Dream devotes almost as much of its page count to his visual-arts career as to his films. He loves to make things with his hands, from the shed he built for his landlord out of scrap wood when he was living in a Hollywood bungalow during the 1970s to the furniture he has designed more recently...
He began making short art films after feeling the desire to add movement to his paintings.

Room to Dream runs on the ebullience of Lynch’s creative process: his gee-willikers enthusiasm, his quirks, his often cryptic yet effective direction of actors (“It needs a little more wind,” he once told MacLachlan, the star of Blue Velvet and Twin Peaks), his openness to improvisation and luck, his do-it-yourself spirit. By all accounts, actors adore him, and a few—Nance, Dern, Watts—have worked for him repeatedly, even when it meant having to do things like don suffocating rabbit costumes to make web videos that no one understands. Don Murray, whose Hollywood career stretches back to playing opposite Marilyn Monroe, describes the set of Twin Peaks: The Return as the happiest he had ever been to. The Lynch of Room to Dream is uniformly kind, considerate and cheerful, with an almost superhuman ability to remember everybody’s first name, even if it’s just the kid who brings him coffee.

Of course, the great puzzle of David Lynch is how this sunny personality can create such disturbing films. Or perhaps it’s no puzzle at all, and every shadow in his psyche gets so comprehensively siphoned off onto screen and canvas that there’s none left to trouble his actual life.
https://slate.com/culture/2018/06/david-lynchs-memoir-room-to-dream-reviewed.html
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Online chemicaloverload

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Re: Here it is... the book thread!
« Reply #100 on: November 03, 2018, 21:08:35 »
Finishing off Victorian Murders by Jan Bondeson. Not only does she tell you of the murders, but the locations of the houses today.
Life is only a dream and we are the imagination of ourselves