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"Never Enough: The Story of The Cure" by Jeff Apter

Started by Andy, January 31, 2006, 00:46:27

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Strange Attraction

I ordered mine before I went to Disneyworld but it didn't come in time for me to read it one the plane  :smth022 When I got home the first thing I did was go get my book! So far I love it !!!!
Can I use some of your lipstick?

B-Flower

Jeff Apter's book is quite interesting. I enjoyed it though I don't agree with author's point of view sometimes. But he obviously did a great job and really listened  to all the records! Besides, I think it's fair that now we could know "the other side of the story" (I mean Laurence Tolhurst, I was glad to know that he's all right now).

It's a pity that the period after Disintegration is reviewed so sketchy and not so deep though  :roll:
How time will heal, make me forget?!
YOU PROMISED ME!!!

revolt_again

Old thread here, but it's never too late to remember that 'Never Enough' is a must-have for anyone interested in The Cure.

Strong points:

1. Exclusive interviews with Lol Tolhurst, Michael Dempsey and other people closely connected with the band (such as Phil Thornalley, occasional bassist and producer of 'Pornography').

2. Lots of extracts of reviews and interviews with band members taken from newspapers that nowadays are probably impossible to find.

3. A comprehensive overview of the band's career, starting from when they were still children and up to around 2005.

4. The author thinks with his own mind and never gives the impression that he is licking the band's boots.


Weak points:

1. There are no exclusive interviews with Robert Smith, or Simon Gallup (there are however quite a few quotes from Robert taken from different newspapers/magazines).

2. After 'Disintegration' the book moves a bit too fast and gives the impression that it is not focussing enough on the music.

3. The author's reviews of the music come across sometimes as being too simplistic, and in particular as regards 'Pornography', his overview of the album seems to me to be too much like that of some lazy and shallow journalist.


So, the weak points are indeed relevant and should not be ignored, but they should also not deter anyone from buying the book, because, like I said, it is really a must-have.

mooki

Quote from: revolt_again on March 21, 2014, 10:52:38
in particular as regards 'Pornography', his overview of the album seems to me to be too much like that of some lazy and shallow journalist.


Aren't they all.


Also, this is a great book and taught me a lot of cool little trivia facts and what not. Not super informative but introspective enough. Although there is far FAR too much Laurence in this book. He's mentioned on every page it seems. I don't care about him and his alcoholism. I bought this to learn more about the Cure and what happens behind the scenes and if anyone, Robert.

MeltingMan

Quote from: mooki on January 09, 2015, 04:40:34I don't care about him and his alcoholism.

This is a bit harsh from today's perspective.I'm grateful for his contributions and his
point of view.
Au lieu de chercher Dieu dans les œuvres, nous
nous cherchons nous-mêmes. Notre paresse est
telle que nous préférons de basses impressions
aisées, qui nous diminuent, aux grandioses qui
exigent de l'effort.

Comment on devient artiste, esthétique. p. 235