Currently Listening to

Started by Steve, April 08, 2007, 08:56:52

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 15 Guests are viewing this topic.

SueC

SueC is time travelling

Ulrich

"It's a rainy afternoon in 1990..." *


* sometimes I wish it were ...
Tear out the pages with all the bad news

BiscuityBoyle


Ulrich

About 35 years ago I heard this for the first time. Back then I did not even know what "gothic music" was, but I guess that was my first encounter with it (I just liked the "dark" athmosphere, the thunder, the church organ...)

Tear out the pages with all the bad news

BiscuityBoyle

Great song, great guitarist


SueC

I actually really love the song Candy because of the wonderful intertwining of those two voices.  I just had difficulty pressing "like" on the video. Bare-chested white men doing music always turns me off - but totally OK with that if it's indigenous performers and music - different cultural connotations.  In contemporary music, it's got the same effect on me as Madonna writhing around on the floor in what she thinks is a suggestive manner... 🤮

I'm through the letter "I" - some highlights:

Starting with one of my favourite voices of all time doing another piece of music so beautiful it can make you cry... the video on this is distorted, but the sound is worth it...


The Split Enz (band from NZ) breakup song:


The mostly teenage U2 - and I still think the album this is off is one of the best debuts ever:


Sadly missed by me:


When Icehouse were called The Flowers, and why they are now called Icehouse... one of two songs of theirs I actually like...


I can't think of many songs by this artist I don't like.  This one as written around the time of her divorce.  Great lyrics, as always.


One of our favourite Cure tracks. ♥


Probably my favourite song on a sexual theme - a topic that's not necessarily easy to write well about.  This one avoids cliché, too much information, and crassness - and is gorgeously poetic.  The music matches the lyrics extraordinarily well...


(How's that one for ya, @word_on_a_wing;))

Not only consistently a great lyricist, but also consistently fabulous live:


A total gem I only discovered this week, by listening to an iPod which also has my husband's music on it (I'm still getting surprises because there's so much music there...):


This song came up just as we were pulling into Fisheries Beach, to do the Point Possession hike yesterday. Quite a few friendly people and their dogs were getting exercise out on the point, all keeping distance.  This song really works for this current context of the pandemic:


An inspirational track, which also suits the same current situation - love the extra-big drum sound on the album version - always seemed to be a feature of Steve Lillywhite productions:


...Big Country are really an electrified folk band, which works fabulously if you ask me. I love how they took their heritage and amplified it - and how they played bagpipe-inspired guitar. You can always hear their love of their beautiful landscape in their music. ♥  So sad that Stuart Adamson didn't make it to my age...

Next... cute socks!  ;)


Another nice one by Nick Cave:


For those who don't know the back story, this singer lost his mother Iris at age 14, wasn't exactly nurtured by his father, and appears, going by some of the songs about it, to have been blamed by his father for her death (of a brain aneurysm, after collapsing at her own father's funeral)....


More goosebumps-inducing metaphors:


Finishing with Christine Anu's lovely cover of the Warumpi Band's Island Home - one of Australia's real anthems...


I don't actually give a flying fish about music history; the primary reason I will love a song is because it speaks to me, and because I find it beautiful, and/or humorous, and/or thought-provoking, and because of the values represented in it, and because it helps me be a better person (and not all of the songs in this selection do that, but I often like things that fulfil at least some of these criteria).  A great song speaks to my head and my heart and also usually makes me want to either sing or move.  I don't like cold, sterile stuff, or bangy, screechy, overcrowded stuff, or self-consciously "I'm so clever" stuff, or thoughtless stuff.  Life's too short.
SueC is time travelling

BiscuityBoyle

Apparently this video, for one of Public Enemy's greatest singles, was a bit too spicy for MTV to play at the time.


BiscuityBoyle

Eno's first few solo albums represent proto-post-punk at its finest.


BiscuityBoyle

Eno's song in the above post is set to Triadisches Ballett, a Bauhaus classic from 1922, the original music for which was written by Paul Hindemith, who happens to be my favorite German composer of the 20th century. Without further ado, a Hindemith classic masterfully rendered by Sviatoslav Richter.


Ulrich

@SueC For Iggy, that was pretty "normal", i.e. I don't think I've seen many photos of his with a shirt on!  :lol:

He's also the one to look at when it comes to "proto-punk" (1970):
Tear out the pages with all the bad news

BiscuityBoyle

Iggy rules so much, still performing shirtless into his 70s... Dude rocks harder than anyone's ever rocked.

You cannot see attachments on this board.

The Stooges were indeed hugely influential, not just Iggy but also the great Ron Asheton on guitar. I guess my favorite album will always be the first one, the sheer power beggars belief:


This track is another of my all time favorites



And of course the Bowie-produced and co-written The Idiot is a postpunk monument... Proper legend.


BiscuityBoyle

Quote from: BiscuityBoyle on April 24, 2020, 15:24:31Eno's first few solo albums represent proto-post-punk at its finest.


The thing with Eno is that he developed a sound resembling what today we understand as postpunk already in the early-to-mid 1970s. These things are never linear and always happening in parallel.


Ulrich

"I believe the impossible, it can come true if we want it to..."


Quote from: BiscuityBoyle on April 24, 2020, 18:16:53The thing with Eno is that he developed a sound resembling what today we understand as postpunk already in the early-to-mid 1970s.

Yeah, I did not mean to talk down his influence on punk (& new wave, postpunk etc.)!!
It's just when I think of "proto-punk" it's The Stooges & MC5 which come to mind (plus other 60's garage stuff).
Tear out the pages with all the bad news

BiscuityBoyle

Probably my favorite Prokofiev miniature cycle


BiscuityBoyle

My favorite band of the moment paying tribute to my favorite band of all time. This song is how I first discovered The Fall ages ago and loved them right away, though didn't delve far beyond a Best Of compilation.