Coronavirus: More than 80% of patients have mild disease and will recover

Started by dsanchez, February 23, 2020, 23:47:08

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dsanchez

QuoteMore than 80% of patients have mild disease and will recover, 14% have severe disease including pneumonia and shortness of breath, 5% have critical disease including respiratory failure, septic shock and multi-organ failure, and 2% of cases are fatal," Tedros said in Geneva. "The risk of death increases the older you are.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/17/coronavirus-causes-mild-disease-in-four-in-five-patients-says-who
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dsanchez

2019.06.08 Dublin
2019.07.04 Novi Sad
2019.07.17 Athens

Ulrich

Thanks for these factual-based postings (very unlike many "panic" postings in other forums over the world)!  :smth023
It's never enough...

SueC

Yeah, we both got swine flu back in the day and it was just a mild illness for us, no respiratory symptoms, just muscle ache and fatigue.  The interesting thing about this one was that after a week, it got better, then disappeared and you thought that was it, and then it would come back again, for a couple of rotations.

Whereas last year we had a non-mass-media publicised strain of influenza that knocked us for six and we were both bedridden with it for an entire fortnight, which has never happened to us before.  Took another month to get over properly and was the worst flu by far we ever had.  The severity profile for coronavirus is about the same as for a moderately bad strain of flu - most people won't be very ill, some will be, and a couple out of every 100 that get it (especially elderly, very young or immunocompromised) will die from it.
SueC is time travelling

Ulrich

Text only in German, from a column at "gmx.de", sad but true:

Quote...im globalen Dorf grassiert das Coronafieber. Und die Dorfbewohner - angeführt von ihren Leitmedien - nähern sich kollektiv dem Gemütszustand einer milden Winterpanik. Menschliche Sensationsgier und mediale Übertreibungslust haben mit vereinten Kräften eine Psychose herbeigeführt, gegen die das Gegengift der Aufklärung derzeit keine Chancen hat. Die Zahl der Corona-Live-Ticker auf den Online-Portalen übertrifft deutlich die Zahl der Verdachtsfälle. Die Vernunft steht weltweit unter Quarantäne.
It's never enough...

Ulrich

Well, this is in English - funny but true.  ;)  :D

https://www.thebeaverton.com/2020/01/report-outbreak-of-idiocy-spreading-10000-times-faster-than-coronavirus/

QuotePublic health officials in Toronto have confirmed its first 50,000 cases of being a misinformed fuckwit as xenophobic conspiracy theories and tales of false cures continue to spread across social media.
It's never enough...

SueC

Thanks for that hilarious link, @Ulrich!   :smth023  :cool


QuotePatients are usually asymptomatic (for stupidity) until they open their mouths or start tweeting.

:lol:


QuoteOur epidemiologists are working hard to identify idiot zero, but there might be more sporadic outbreaks of coronavirus-related imbecility," added Dr. Smith.

Meanwhile, health officials are dreading teaching the population a complicated prevention technique: washing your hands.

:rofl

PS: If idiocy exasperates you, here's two great antidotes:

The Darwin Awards:  https://darwinawards.com/

The IgNobel Awards:  https://www.improbable.com/ig-about/winners/
SueC is time travelling

word_on_a_wing


Things are getting weird.
Here's a fight that took place in an Australian supermarket... about toilet paper 🙄
"Where the flesh meets the spirit world,
Where the traffic is thin..."

dsanchez

Quote from: word_on_a_wing on March 08, 2020, 14:30:25Here's a fight that took place in an Australian supermarket... about toilet paper 🙄

stupid people everywhere...
2019.06.08 Dublin
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Ulrich

Quote from: dsanchez on March 08, 2020, 14:58:11stupid people everywhere...

Yeah, plus it makes me wonder: why do they need toilet paper? When they got their trousers full already...  :P
It's never enough...

SueC

Honestly, it's ridiculous.  This morning we went grocery shopping and the entire aisle of toilet paper was sold out.  I think people are confusing coronavirus with cholera, and expecting rampant diarrhoea and/or toilet paper manufacturing shortages.  We didn't need any toilet paper anyway because we always buy bulk packs because it's more cost-effective and uses less packaging (due to the reduced surface area to volume ratio of bulk packs).

The authorities have simply suggested having two weeks' worth of groceries, hygiene and medical supplies, mostly in case you get ill and should then stay at home (coronavirus or not - people should really do this with any flu or cold but do they, oh no, they go spread it charitably to all their workmates and go sneezing along in supermarkets instead of staying home in bed with a book and a mug of tea until they stop shedding pathogens, and if people didn't do that, there'd be over 80% less people catching cold and flu).

The other thing supermarkets are running out of here is bulk packs of rice.  Apparently, people expect they'll be wiping their bottoms more than usual and eating lots of risotto when the outbreak hits Australia.  Brett thought a legitimate reason for Australians wiping their bottoms more than usual is that several years ago, we overtook America as the most obese country in the world, so he says there are now more square centimeters of bottom to wipe per individual on average.

By the way, it wouldn't matter if we were unable to buy toilet paper for a year, or ever again.  We have compost toilets and are always looking for ways to repurpose worn-out cotton or linen shirts or bedsheets.  You can cut these into squares and used them as handkerchiefs, for example, and I have some really pretty hankies made from my favourite worn-out pyjama pants, with clouds all over them.  Natural fabrics do very well in a compost toilet system - but don't try to flush them down conventional toilets (you can, however, treat them like you would cloth nappies, and I know some hippies who do this as a matter of course).

Toilet paper is actually a relatively recent invention.  A hundred years ago, in Australia, most people were using squares of old newspaper hung off a nail in their outhouses.  Kids used to cut the newspapers into squares and hole-punch them.  It's not as if this wouldn't be possible to do again.  I don't understand why people don't think laterally and use their imaginations...

...and use their commonsense and not spread illnesses around just because they're not the current sensational news...  :1f62b:
SueC is time travelling

Ulrich

How many cases does Australia have anyway?
I mean it's still late summer (early autumn) there? Because they say in Europe, with spring coming and the sun and UV rays intensifying, the hope is that the virus won't spread that easily any more.
(Which, btw, makes open air festivals in summer likely to happen.)
It's never enough...

dsanchez

Quote from: Ulrich on March 09, 2020, 09:17:12I mean it's still late summer (early autumn) there? Because they say in Europe, with spring coming and the sun and UV rays intensifying, the hope is that the virus won't spread that easily any more.

if it's like the flu, it might be like that, fingers crossed!

QuoteThe flu season in the U.S. can begin as early as October, but usually does not get into full swing until December. The season generally reaches its peak in February and ends in March (2). In the southern hemisphere, however, where winter comes during our summer months, the flu season falls between June and September. In other words, wherever there is winter, there is flu (3). In fact, even its name, "influenza" may be a reference to its original Italian name, influenza di freddo, meaning "influence of the cold" (4).

http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2014/the-reason-for-the-season-why-flu-strikes-in-winter/
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SueC

Quote from: Ulrich on March 09, 2020, 09:17:12How many cases does Australia have anyway?
I mean it's still late summer (early autumn) there?

In WA, a handful, brought in by travellers, so far mostly confined to being transmitted to spouses, while in self-isolation:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-09/fifth-case-of-coronavirus-confirmed-in-wa/12038696

Traditionally though, cold and flu season will start around May here, so that's when new viruses like this too will be expected to spike.

PS:  One of my honorary sisters just sent me this:



ROFL :lol:
SueC is time travelling

word_on_a_wing

Sue your location in rural WA Australia is likely to be useful in such a situation as this! :)

Australia today has 100people diagnosed with Coronavirus, and while most are travellers from overseas there has now been cases of local transmission.  NSW has greatest number (54). Here in Australia there's 18 cases.

Yes David the flu season seems relevant ... Here's something I read today
"A plan published by the Victorian Government to outline its response to the outbreak, says modelling shows a coronavirus pandemic is likely to coincide with Australia's flu season.
It says "the effects of both diseases may be felt simultaneously".

The Victorian Premier spoke today.
https://www.abc.net.au
His statements give the impression some big changes are likely to occur in coming weeks, at least in the state I'm in.
...this is all feeling a bit surreal

What's happening in places where the rest of you live?
"Where the flesh meets the spirit world,
Where the traffic is thin..."